Posted by: mens health therapist 84334199 | May 25, 2017

BLOOD IN SEMEN Hematospermia

Blood in ejaculation (hematospermia)

Blood in the semen does not necessarily signal a major medical problem. 
For younger men blood in the urine tend to resolve by itself without any 
treatment. For older men this could be infection or inflammation of the 
tubes and glands that carry sperm into the penis like the seminal vesicles,
 vas deferens or even the prostate. This can also be an STD or 
sexually transmitted disease or an UTI urinary tract infection.
Further causes can be trauma to the pelvic region or from a medical 
procedure which can lead to temporary bleeding. This can disappear after 
a few days your doctor can be consulted for assessment. Radiation, 
vasectomy, hemmorhoid treatment,  excessive masturbation, excessive 
vigorous sexual activity can also cause blood in the semen.

Having an enlarged prostate can cause the prostate to squeeze the 
urethra can also be linked to blood in the semen. 

Other obstruction to the tubes and glands in the reproductive or 
urinal region like kidneys, urethra  can also cause blood in the semen. 

Other medical conditions like leukemia, unusually elevated high blood
 pressure, liver damage can also produce the symptom or blood in the urine.

It is not known how common this symptom is because most men do not 
tend to look  at their ejaculatory fluid.  

To diagnose blood in the semen your doctor may do a urinalysis to 
check for infection in the urinary tract.  A blood test can also be 
taken to check the PSA - prostate specific antigen to check for enlarged 
prostate and subsequently do a biopsy to check for prostate infection.
Treatment can include antibiotic or subsequently a biopsy.
If the patient has repeated episodes of blood in the semen coupled with 
painful urination or painful ejaculation then a urologist 
should be consulted.  It is generally a good idea to check this health
symptom if it get chronic (longer then 3 months) as it may eventually 
infect the kidneys and the bladder.

Disclaimer!  I am not a medical professional.  
Nothing on this site  is  meant to replace medical advice. 
Please contact your doctor about your health.



							        	

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